Fife’s National Dish – A challenge to the Kingdom’s chefs

Pie Dish

As a Fife Ambassador I enjoy visiting the many varied and interesting towns, sites and places around the kingdom. Of course this involves enjoying the abundant, varied and interesting cafes, restaurants and pubs that are found throughout the kingdom.

What do you and the many chefs of Fife recognize as Fife’s “national dish”? As an archaeologist and historian my research has come up with reference to a Kingdom of Fife Pie. A traditional rabbit pie. So what is the best recipe for such a pie? Is there another dish or recipe that can claim to be Fife’s National Dish? Some say its Chilli Ca Canny……..

Advertisements

Burns Day

Tartan bagpipe bird

Have a great Robert Burns Day everyone and embrace the haggis

Haggis is a savoury pudding containing sheep’s pluck; minced with onion, oatmeal, suet, spices, and salt, mixed with stock, traditionally encased in the animal’s stomach though now often in an artificial casing instead.

The history of the haggis is indeed a strange one and shrouded in history. Did it come from the Romans? from, Scandinavia? even the terrible thought of coming from England!

Wherever it originated from it certainly is a tasty food, and the modern spicy version is a thing to behold.

Haggis is traditionally served as part of the Burns supper on or near January 25, the birthday of Scotland’s national poet Robert Burns. Burns wrote the poem Address to a Haggis, which starts “Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face, Great chieftain o’ the puddin-race!” In Burns’s lifetime haggis was a common dish of the poor as it was nourishing yet very cheap, being made from leftover parts of sheep otherwise thrown away.